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A continuation of Advanced Vietnamese I.

An introduction to Vietnamese literature, including Vietnamese newspapers, poetry, short stories, folk literature, and excerpts from classical and modern Vietnamese writings.

Designed to prepare students to travel to Nigeria and for research using authentic research materials. Study of geography and of political and economic structures of Nigeria and West Africa. Focus on reading Yoruban texts.

Equal emphasis on listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will learn grammar and about 220 Kanji characters. All lessons include Japanese culture notes as well. The course also includes character recognition and pronunciation exercise sessions on computers.

Exploration of the aspects of Swahili literary history and civilization. It will provide knowledge of East Africa (not explored in regular language classes) through geography, history, political, and economic structures. The main focus will be on critical readings on Swahili literature, history, and civilization.

Research methods in the Arts and Humanities to enhance directed study participation and Honors thesis/project preparation.

Advanced grammar, reading, conversation, and composition.

Equal emphasis on listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will learn grammar and about 270 Kanji characters. All lessons include Japanese culture notes as well.

An exploration of Swahili culture in contemporary literary texts; a discussion on how literary texts about the Swahili language and its speakers are used to manifest the culture and how external influences affect the indigenous Swahili culture. Readings of novels from the target country, documents, and other archival materials will be expected of the students.

A continuation of Advanced Chinese I.

Overview of African languages and cultures, their diversity and similarities. Critical approach to discourses on Africa.

Historical and thematic treatment of fictional speculation about scientific matters from the dialogues of Plato to the contemporary science fiction of Vonnegut.

Comparative study of the self as presented in literature of the first person (such as lyric poetry and autobiography) with particular emphasis on questions of genre, rhetoric, and poetics.

A survey of fiction films on distinct characteristics of Korean culture. A wide range of works on spiritual traditions and material culture in Korea will be examined, but the main emphasis will be on films inspired by literature, visual arts, music, and performing arts in the modern and pre-modern periods.

World literature represented by women writers from the seventh century B.C. through the seventeenth century A.D.

The literature of twentieth-century Africa in translation with emphasis on the African novel.

The study of selected representative African plays of the colonial and post-independence periods.

A discussion of twentieth-century literary works (emphasis on narrative and drama) dealing with the reinterpretation of ancient classical myths, inclusive of English, American, Italian, French, German, and Russian Literatures.

The evolution of the mystery story in the United States, England, and Europe, based on readings from such masters of the genre as Poe, Doyle, Christie, Simenon, Hammett, Chandler, et al. All readings in English.

Cultures of China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, with emphasis on the formation of Chinese culture and its diffusion and variation within the other national groups.

Literary and anthropological approaches to the study of myth in culture.

Selected works of contemporary world literature, with emphasis on works from Eastern Europe, the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

The exploration of a culture's conceptions of nature--and the social implications-- through examination of texts of literature and other discourses. Course may focus on either Western or non-Western societies.

This course addresses issues related to women in East Asia from comparative perspectives by examining how they are represented and how they choose to represent themselves in literary texts, film, and sociological material.

The Roma tribes of Central and Eastern Europe, including their cultures, customs, languages, literature, and music.

Anti-semitism and anti-Roma sentiments and practices in Central and East Europe. How the European Union is addressing this problem and future prospects for these minorities at risk.

Selected works written for children from antiquity to the nineteenth century. Special emphasis on historical, cultural, religious, social, and linguistic contexts.

Selected works written for children from antiquity through the twentieth century. Special emphasis on historical, cultural, religious, social, and linguistic contexts.

Independent study and research under the direction of individual faculty members.

Independent study and research in Swahili language and literature under the direction of individual faculty members. Focus on reading and analysis of Swahili literary writings (including works in translation).

Independent study and research under the direction of individual faculty members.

The student undertakes an in-depth study of Korean language, literature, and culture in consultation with a faculty member.

Independent study and research in Yoruban language and literature under the direction of individual faculty. Focus is on reading and analysis of Yoruban literary texts (including works in translation from Yoruba-speaking communities in Africa and the Diaspora).

Independent study and research under the direction of individual faculty members.

Introduction to the language, life, and culture of Yoruba- speaking people in West Africa and other parts of the World.

Students will be able to speak, comprehend, read, and write business Korean and will also be able to understand Korean business culture through classroom activities, field trips, and homework assignments based on authentic material.

A continuation of Business Korean.

Selected problems in the Humanities which have special or current relevance to members of the University community. Topics will vary to meet interest and demand.

The methods and literary theories encompassed by the discipline of Comparative Literature.

Selected problems in the Humanities which have special or current relevance to members of the University community. Topics will vary to meet interest and demand.

The capstone course for the undergraduate major in comparative literature, focusing on a particular theme, methodology, theory or problem.

Literary and philosophical texts of various historical periods that trace changes in how human beings understand their non-human environment.

Literature of Western Europe (Italian, French, Spanish, Germanic, and English) 1450-1600, with emphasis on literary types and prevailing ideas.

The rise and development of Romanticism in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, with reading of selected literature and criticism.

Early Romanticism: 1750–1830, with readings of selected literature and criticism.

Middle to late romanticism: 1820 -1900, with readings of selected literature and criticism.

Lyric poetry from the mid-nineteenth century to the present.

Literary forms and issues in Europe ca. 1550-1700, with special attention to the intellectual background and the interrelationships between literature and other arts and sciences.

The literatures of medieval Europe with emphasis on major literary genres and the philosophical and social presuppositions which inform them.

An introduction to classical Chinese focusing on translation, analysis of grammar, and the semantic range and use of commonly occurring classical Chinese words. Readings include selections of the early classics through later imperial literature.

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Comparative Literature
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